KGI Genomics

KGI/ COH Genomics GENE 370

 

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  • Contains 2 Component(s)

    Week 1 of KGI Genomics Course

    Jeffrey Weitzel, MD

    Professor of Oncology and Population Sciences

    Jeffrey N. Weitzel, MD, is board Certified in Medical Oncology and Clinical Genetics, and founded the Clinical Cancer Genomics Community Research Network. He co-founded the Clinical Cancer Genomics Community of Practice with Dr. Blazer. A Breast Cancer Research Foundation Scholar and an honorary Professor of Oncology for the Latin American School of Oncology, he is also the ASCO Conquer Cancer Research Professor in Breast Cancer Disparities. At the vanguard of precision prevention, Dr. Weitzel’s multidisciplinary clinical, research, and training experience emphasize translational research in cancer disparities, genomic cancer risk assessment, chemoprevention, targeted therapy, clinical and psychosocial outcomes, genetic epidemiology and health services research, with a focus on underserved populations. Dr. Weitzel received the American Society of Human Genetics Arno Motulsky-Barton Childs Award for Excellence in Human Genetics Education.

    Elisabeth King, MSN, RN, FNP-C, AGN-BC

    Nurse Practitioner

    Elisabeth King, RN, FNP, AOCNP, AGN is a nurse practitioner and the senior manager of Genomic Cancer Risk Counseling in the Division of Clinical Cancer Genomics at City of Hope. Ms. King joined City of Hope in 2018 from Texas Oncology, where she helped lead and support the Advanced Practice Provider and Genetics programs throughout the state. She is a family nurse practitioner and also holds advanced nursing certifications in oncology and genetics. She received her bachelor’s degree in biology with a focus on genetics and biotechnology from University of Texas at Austin. She earned her master’s degree in nursing at Frontier Nursing University. King is an alumnus and clinical faculty member of the City of Hope Intensive Course in Cancer Risk Assessment.

  • Contains 4 Component(s)

    Week 2 of KGI Genomics Course

    Bita Nehoray, MS, CGC

    Senior Genetic Counselor

    City of Hope

    Bita Nehoray, MS, CGC, is a licensed board-certified genetic counselor specializing in cancer genetics. She received her Master’s degree in Human Genetics and Genetic Counseling from Stanford University. Ms. Nehoray joined the City of Hope Division of Clinical Cancer Genomics in 2012, where she provides cancer genetics services for patients and families suspected to have a hereditary predisposition to cancer, with a focus in Li-Fraumeni syndrome. She is fluent in Spanish and Farsi and is committed to advancing the provision of cancer genetics services to medically underserved and culturally diverse populations. Other clinical responsibilities include providing pro-bono cancer genetic counseling services to underserved Latino families through an outreach program established by the Division of Clinical Cancer Genomics and supported through government and foundations grants and compassionate funding. Current research projects include understanding cancer risk, penetrance, prevalence, and clinical outcomes for individuals with TP53 mutations as part of the LiFT Up study, evaluating the spectrum of germline variants in Israeli breast cancer patients, and assessing Community-based provider experiences with polygenic risk scores in genetic cancer risk assessment. She serves on the Genetic Counseling Advisory Committee for the Li-Fraumeni Syndrome Association. She is an active member of the National Society of Genetic Counselors, Southern California Genetic Counselors, and the American Society of Human Genetics.

    Kathleen R. Blazer, EdD, MS, CGC

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Director of Cancer Genomics Education Program

    Kathleen R. Blazer is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Population Sciences, Director of the Cancer Genomics Education Program (CGEP), and a bilingual licensed, board-certified cancer risk genetic counselor with the Division of Clinical Cancer Genetics at City of Hope. Dr. Blazer has worked the development, administration and assessment of the NCI-funded initiatives of the CGEP (a multifaceted cancer genetics education and training program for physicians, allied health care professionals and post-doctoral researchers) since joining the division in 1998. The outcomes and theoretical framework her education research serve as the cornerstone of the Intensive Course and Clinical Cancer Genomics Community of Practice (CCGCoP), which brings cancer genetics practitioners from diverse practice settings together for professional learning and enduring patient-centered support across the U.S. and internationally.

    Co-PIs Dr. Blazer and Dr. Jeffrey Weitzel were recipients of the 2019 American Society of Human Genetics Arno Motulsky-Barton Childs Award for Excellence in Human Genetics Education, in recognition of the scope and reach of their education initiatives. Dr. Blazer is a member of the American Society of Human Genetics, the National Society of Genetic Counselors, the American Association of Cancer Education, and the National Human Genome Research Institute Inter-Society Coordinating Committee for Practitioner Education in Genomics.

    ​Charité Ricker, MS, CGC

    Cancer Genetic Counselor and Genetic Services Coordinator

    Charité Ricker, MS, LCGC - is a board certified genetic counselor with specialization in hereditary cancer risk assessment with the University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine. She has a Bachelor’s of Science in genetics from Texas A&M University and received her Masters of Science in genetic counseling at California State University, Northridge. Ms. Ricker is fluent in Spanish and is interested in the provision of cancer genetics services in medically underserved and culturally diverse populations. She is actively involved in cancer genetics education to physicians, physician fellows, nurses, other healthcare professionals and patients. Ms. Ricker is a voting member of the Institutional Review Board for the USC Health Science Campus, LAC+USC Medical Center and Health Research Association. Ms. Ricker is a member of the National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC), the Collaborative Group of the Americas on Inherited Colorectal Cancer (CGA), the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), and the Society of Behavioral Medicine (SBM). She has served as the chair of the NSGC Cultural Competency Sub-committee and as a member of the ASCO Genetics Sub-committee.  She was the 2019 recipient of the NSGC’s Leader in Cultural Advocacy Award. 

  • Contains 5 Component(s)

    Week 3 of KGI Genomics Course

    Jeffrey Weitzel, MD

    Professor of Oncology and Population Sciences

    Jeffrey N. Weitzel, MD, is board Certified in Medical Oncology and Clinical Genetics, and founded the Clinical Cancer Genomics Community Research Network. He co-founded the Clinical Cancer Genomics Community of Practice with Dr. Blazer. A Breast Cancer Research Foundation Scholar and an honorary Professor of Oncology for the Latin American School of Oncology, he is also the ASCO Conquer Cancer Research Professor in Breast Cancer Disparities. At the vanguard of precision prevention, Dr. Weitzel’s multidisciplinary clinical, research, and training experience emphasize translational research in cancer disparities, genomic cancer risk assessment, chemoprevention, targeted therapy, clinical and psychosocial outcomes, genetic epidemiology and health services research, with a focus on underserved populations. Dr. Weitzel received the American Society of Human Genetics Arno Motulsky-Barton Childs Award for Excellence in Human Genetics Education.

    Julie Culver, MS, CGC

    Genetic Counselor

    USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center

    Julie Culver, MS, LCGC, CCRP is a licensed genetic counselor and Clinical Instructor specializing in cancer genetics. She received her Master’s degree at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor in 1994. Ms. Culver then worked in Cancer Prevention and Public Health at the University of Washington and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research in Seattle for almost a decade. In 2004, she joined the City of Hope Division of Clinical Cancer Genetics where worked for 8 years and served as the Assistant Director of the Cancer Screening & Prevention Program Network and conducted research pertaining to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer and decision-making for woman carrying deleterious BRCA mutations and variants of uncertain significance. In 2012, she moved to the USC Norris Cancer Comprehensive Cancer Center where she currently serves on the faculty of Medical Oncology and is the lead genetic counselor. Her research pertains to hereditary cancer panel testing, cancer risk perception, and medical decision-making following genetic testing. She has served on the faculty for the City of Hope Intensive Course and taught cancer risk assessment to health professionals and students since 2004.

    Bita Nehoray, MS, CGC

    Senior Genetic Counselor

    City of Hope

    Bita Nehoray, MS, CGC, is a licensed board-certified genetic counselor specializing in cancer genetics. She received her Master’s degree in Human Genetics and Genetic Counseling from Stanford University. Ms. Nehoray joined the City of Hope Division of Clinical Cancer Genomics in 2012, where she provides cancer genetics services for patients and families suspected to have a hereditary predisposition to cancer, with a focus in Li-Fraumeni syndrome. She is fluent in Spanish and Farsi and is committed to advancing the provision of cancer genetics services to medically underserved and culturally diverse populations. Other clinical responsibilities include providing pro-bono cancer genetic counseling services to underserved Latino families through an outreach program established by the Division of Clinical Cancer Genomics and supported through government and foundations grants and compassionate funding. Current research projects include understanding cancer risk, penetrance, prevalence, and clinical outcomes for individuals with TP53 mutations as part of the LiFT Up study, evaluating the spectrum of germline variants in Israeli breast cancer patients, and assessing Community-based provider experiences with polygenic risk scores in genetic cancer risk assessment. She serves on the Genetic Counseling Advisory Committee for the Li-Fraumeni Syndrome Association. She is an active member of the National Society of Genetic Counselors, Southern California Genetic Counselors, and the American Society of Human Genetics.

    Susan Shehayeb, MS, CGC

    Genetic Counselor

    City of Hope

    Susan Shehayeb, MS, CGC, is a licensed board-certified genetic counselor specializing in cancer genetics. She has a Master’s of Science degree in genetic counseling from University of California Irvine. Previous to completing her master’s degree, Ms. Shehayeb earned her bachelor’s degree in molecular, cell and developmental biology from University of California Los Angeles. Ms. Shehayeb joined the City of Hope Division of Clinical Cancer Genomics in 2017, having previously undergone clinical training at City of Hope. She is fluent in Arabic and is in the process of achieving fluency in Spanish. She has participated in the training of genetic counseling students from multiple programs, including assuming the role of rotation supervisor. Ms. Shehayeb's clinical role has centered on widening patient access to genetic counseling and testing throughout the City of Hope network as the lead genetic counselor for the City of Hope | South Pasadena site. Her past research investigated lifestyle choices in the context of genetic counseling and genetic testing for cancer risk. She is a member of the National Society of Genetic Counselors and the Southern California Genetic Counselors.

  • Contains 0 Component(s)

    Week 4 of KGI Genomics Course

    Judy Garber, MD, MPH

    Director, Center for Cancer Genetics and Prevention

    Dana Farber Cancer Institute

    Dr. Garber is the Director of the Cancer Genetics and Prevention Disease Center at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and a Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Garber conducts research in clinical cancer genetics, with a special focus in the genetics of breast cancer. She has played a major role in the development of national guidelines in cancer genetics. She is also a leader in research into the characteristics and treatment of triple negative or basal-like breast cancer, the most common form in women with BRCA1 mutations. Her translational research focuses on the evaluation of novel agents targeting DNA repair defects in breast cancer, including PARP inhibitors for treatment and prevention of breast cancer and other BRCA-associated cancers.

     In 2011-2012, Dr. Garber was the President of American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), the largest organization of cancer researchers in the world. She is a member of the National Cancer Advisory Board and was recently elected to the Institute of Medicine.

    Carol Fabian, MD

    Director, Breast Cancer Prevention & Survivorship Centers

    KU Breast Cancer Prevention Center

    Dr. Carol Fabian is a breast medical oncologist, University Distinguished Professor, and holds the Morris Endowed Chair in Cancer Prevention at the University of Kansas Medical Center.  She received her medical degree from the University of Kansas in 1972, and fellowship in Medical Oncology at the University of Kansas in 1977.  She is board certified in both Internal Medicine and Medical Oncology.  She  has been on the faculty in the Division of Medical Oncology since 1977 and has served in multiple capacities including Medical Director of the Cancer Center, Founder and Director of the Breast Cancer Prevention and Survivorship Research Center, Leader or co-Leader of the Cancer Prevention Program, and Associate Director of Clinical Research in the NCI Designated Cancer Center.

  • Contains 2 Component(s)

    Week 5 of KGI Genomics Course

    Colin Pritchard, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor

    University of Washington

    Dr. Pritchard is an Assistant Professor of Laboratory Medicine, as well as the associate director of the genetics and solid tumors laboratory at the University of Washington Medical Center that services the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance (SCCA) that includes Seattle Children’s hospital. Dr. Pritchard undertook his undergraduate and graduate training at the University of Washington in Seattle in the United States. He completed his medical training at the University of Washington School of Medicine. The Pritchard laboratory focuses on oncology molecular diagnostics, particularly the source and utility of cell-free nucleic acid biomarkers in blood, and the development of innovative molecular diagnostics for the identification of mutations that can guide therapeutic decision-making. His clinical work focuses on applications of next-generation sequencing gene panels for cancer risk assessment and precision treatment. He has led the development and implementation of the ColoSeq™ Lynch and Polyposis Syndrome Panel and UW-OncoPlex™ Cancer Gene Panel in current clinical use for cancer patients and their families.

  • Contains 4 Component(s)

    Week 6 of KGI Genomics Course

    Sonia S. Kupfer, MD

    Assistant Professor of Medicine

    University of Chicago Medical Center

    Sonia S. Kupfer is an Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Section of Gastroenterology at the University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL. She is the Director of the Gastrointestinal Cancer Risk and Prevention Clinic and co-Director of the Comprehensive Cancer Risk and Prevention clinic at the University of Chicago. She is funded by a K08 career development award from the NIH/NCI to study colorectal cancer genetic susceptibility variants in African Americans. Dr. Kupfer is also currently investigating genetics related to chemopreventive agents for colorectal cancer, notably vitamin D. In addition to her translational research, Dr. Kupfer is actively engaged in clinical studies in high-risk colorectal cancer primarily Lynch syndrome. Her clinical work focuses on hereditary GI cancer evaluation, testing and management. She also has served as co-Director of two CME conferences on genomics. Dr. Kupfer received her undergraduate degree from Yale University and then completed medical school, residency, chief residency and gastroenterology fellowship training at the University of Chicago. She is originally from a northern suburb of Chicago and currently resides in the Hyde Park area with her husband, an art dealer, and her two children.

    Heather Hampel, MS, CGC

    Associate Director, Division of Clinical Cancer Genomics

    City of Hope

    Heather Hampel completed her Bachelor of Science degree in Molecular Genetics at the Ohio State University in 1993.  She attained her Master’s degree in Human Genetics from Sarah Lawrence College in 1995.  She received certification from the American Board of Genetic Counseling in 1996.  She worked as a cancer genetic counselor at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center from 1995-1997 and at The Ohio State University from 1997-2021. She is now at City of Hope National Medical Center where she is a Professor in the Department of Medical Oncology & Therapeutics Research and Associate Director of the Division of Clinical Cancer Genomics.  Her research areas of interest include Lynch syndrome and universal screening for Lynch syndrome.  She has over 90 publications; including first author publications in the New England Journal of Medicine, Cancer Research, and the Journal of Clinical Oncology.  Heather is a former member of the Board of Directors of the National Society of Genetic Counselors (Region IV Representative in 2003-4) and of the American Board of Genetic Counseling  (2007-2011) where she served as President in 2009 and 2010.  She received the Region IV Leadership Award from NSGC in 2006. She was on the Steering Committee of the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable from 2016-2020. She was on the Council for the Collaborative Group of the Americas on Inherited Gastrointestinal Cancers from 2015-2018 and served as president from 2017-2018. She was Secretary/Treasurer Elect of NSGC in 2021 and will be Secretary/Treasurer in 2022.

    Lauren Gima, MS, LCGC

    Genetic Counselor

    City of Hope

    Lauren Gima, MS, CGC is a board-certified, licensed genetic counselor at City of Hope in Duarte, CA where she specializes in clinical cancer genomics. She earned her MS degree in Genetic Counseling from Northwestern University and BS degree in Human Biology from University of California San Diego. Her primary clinical responsibilities include providing cancer genetic counseling services for City of Hope’s patient population. She is a clinical rotation supervisor for students of the Keck Graduate Institute (KGI) Genetic Counseling program, the University of California Irvine Genetic Counseling program, and the University of California Los Angeles Genetic Counseling program. She also serves as a community mentor for the KGI Genetic Counseling program, providing ongoing support and guidance for new genetic counseling students. Lauren is a member of the National Society of Genetic Counselors, the Collaborative Group of the Americas on Inherited Gastrointestinal Cancers, the Southern California Genetic Counselors, and the Minority Genetics Professionals Network.

    Deanna Erwin, MS, CGC

    Genetic Counselor, Interim Supervisor

    Deanna Erwin MS, CGC, is a licensed, board-certified genetic counselor specializing in cancer genetics. She has a Master’s degree in Genetic Counseling from the University of Michigan and a Bachelor’s degree in Biology and Psychology from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

    Her primary clinical focus is providing risk assessment and genetic counseling services to individuals concerned about hereditary cancer risks. Ms. Erwin joined the City of Hope Division of Clinical Cancer Genomics in 2019, and previously worked as a genetic counselor at the Baylor College of Medicine Adult Genetics Clinic in Houston, TX. She is an active member of the National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) and is currently serving as Vice-Chair of the Access and Service Delivery Committee. As part of her role in NSGC, she has contributed to multiple resources designed to increase provider efficiency and access to genetic counselors.

  • Contains 2 Component(s)

    Week 7 of KGI Genomics Course

    Gregory Idos MD, MS

    Associate Clinical Professor, Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology

    City of Hope

    Dr. Idos is a board-certified gastroenterologist and trained cancer geneticist, who specializes in the care of patients with Lynch syndrome, FAP (familial adenomatous polyposis) and other inherited syndromes. The goal of his research is to find new ways to prevent cancer and to improve treatment and care for cancer patients.

    A UCLA graduate, Dr. Idos has a master’s degree from Keck School of Medicine of USC. He received his medical degree at University of Vermont, continued his residency training at USC and completed his gastroenterology fellowship at Brigham and Women’s Hospital at Harvard. Dr. Idos is an associate clinical professor in Division of Gastroenterology and leads one of the largest multicenter studies examining the benefits and harms of “multiplex” gene panel testing. His research also focuses on the evaluation of novel technologies with the goal of providing new tools for hereditary cancer risk assessment and the development of novel cellular models to elucidate the fundamental mechanisms of microsatellite instability and Lynch syndrome.

    Rachelle Manookian, MS, CGC

    Genetic Counselor

    City of Hope

    Rachelle Manookian, M.S., C.G.C., is a board-certified genetic counselor specializing in cancer genetics. She has a special interest in prostate and genitourinary cancers. She has an M.S. in genetic counseling from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and a B.S. in biological sciences with a focus in neurobiology from University of California Irvine, as well as minors in Spanish literature and cognitive psychology. Manookian joined City of Hope’s Division of Clinical Cancer Genomics in April 2019. Prior to City of Hope, she was a general adult genetic counselor at the Greater Los Angeles VA Medical Center, where she served veterans across four VA hospitals in Southern California. Every summer, Manookian volunteers as a one-on-one counselor at Camp Sunshine during their Fanconi Anemia week. She has previous experience volunteering with victims of domestic violence, and is a California state certified domestic violence advocate. She also has special interests in education and bioethics, and her past research investigated the intersection of disability advocacy groups and prenatal genetic counseling sessions.

  • Contains 2 Component(s)

    Week 8 of KGI Genomics Course

    Sonia S. Kupfer, MD

    Assistant Professor of Medicine

    University of Chicago Medical Center

    Sonia S. Kupfer is an Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Section of Gastroenterology at the University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL. She is the Director of the Gastrointestinal Cancer Risk and Prevention Clinic and co-Director of the Comprehensive Cancer Risk and Prevention clinic at the University of Chicago. She is funded by a K08 career development award from the NIH/NCI to study colorectal cancer genetic susceptibility variants in African Americans. Dr. Kupfer is also currently investigating genetics related to chemopreventive agents for colorectal cancer, notably vitamin D. In addition to her translational research, Dr. Kupfer is actively engaged in clinical studies in high-risk colorectal cancer primarily Lynch syndrome. Her clinical work focuses on hereditary GI cancer evaluation, testing and management. She also has served as co-Director of two CME conferences on genomics. Dr. Kupfer received her undergraduate degree from Yale University and then completed medical school, residency, chief residency and gastroenterology fellowship training at the University of Chicago. She is originally from a northern suburb of Chicago and currently resides in the Hyde Park area with her husband, an art dealer, and her two children.

    Thomas Slavin, MD, FACMG, DABMD

    Senior Vice President of Medical Affairs for Oncology

    Myriad Genetics

    Dr. Slavin is Senior Vice President of Medical Affairs for Oncology at Myriad Genetics. He is a physician-scientist, triple-board-certified in clinical genetics, molecular diagnostics and pediatrics. Most recently, he served as assistant professor in the departments of Medical Oncology & Therapeutics Research and Population Sciences at City of Hope National Medical Center. Dr. Slavin graduated medical school with Alpha-Omega-Alpha-honors from the University of South Florida. He completed his residency programs at Case Western Reserve in Cleveland, Ohio; this training included a postdoctoral research year in genetic epidemiology. He has also completed graduate course work towards a Masters degree in clinical research through the University of Southern California. He is an active member of the American Association of Cancer Research, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the American Society of Human Genetics, the Collaborative Group of the Americas on Inherited Colorectal Cancer, and is a fellow of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics. He has served on National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN)committees for both the genetics of and screening for colorectal cancer. He has served on three ClinGen expert working group committees for variant classification of breast, gastrointestinal and ovarian cancer predisposition genes. Focused on expanding genetics education for cancer care providers, Dr. Slavin has helped shape both ASCO University as well as City of Hope’s hereditary genomics training program. He is a well-published researcher in the field of medical genetics, including over 60 journal articles, multiple book chapters, and numerous presentations at national and international medical meetings. He has been involved in many national cancer research grants, and was a 2018 National Institutes of Health (NIH) K08-career development grant awardee.

  • Contains 3 Component(s)

    Week 9 of KGI Genomics Course

    Sandra Dreike, MS, CGC

    Genetic Counselor

    City of Hope

    Sandra Dreike, MS, CGC is a licensed board-certified genetic counselor who specializes in cancer genetics. She received her Master of Science degree is Genetic Counseling from University of California, Irvine and her bachelor’s degree in Biology from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo. Sandra joined the City of Hope Division of Clinical Cancer Genomics in 2019. She previously practiced as a genetic counselor in Honolulu, HI where she specialized in cancer genetics and general pediatric and adult genetics. Sandra provides genetic counseling and cancer genetic risk assessments at City of Hope. In addition to patient care she assists with the Intensive Course and is involved in research. Sandra is a member of the National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) and Southern California Genetic Counselors (SCGC).

    Jane Churpek, MD

    Assistant Professor, Section of Hematology/Oncology and Center for Clinical Cancer Genetics

    University of Chicago

    Dr. Jane Churpek is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Hematology, Oncology, and Palliative Care at The University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Hematology, and Oncology. In her clinical practice, she cares for adults with low blood counts due to acquired and inherited causes, including clonal hematopoiesis and inherited bone marrow failure syndromes, and performs diagnosis and management of diverse hereditary cancer predisposition syndromes such as familial leukemia, Li Fraumeni syndrome, BAP1 syndrome, etc. She runs a translational research program aimed at defining the inherited basis of cancer and bone marrow disorders, especially among understudied tumors and blood disorders. Her goal is to improve diagnosis, early detection, treatment and, ultimately, prevention of morbidity and mortality for patients with these disorders. Dr. Churpek has contributed to the understanding of several novel hereditary blood cancer predisposition syndromes and the role of inherited predisposition in exposure associated cancers such as therapy-related leukemia and mesothelioma.

  • Contains 2 Component(s)

    Week 10 of KGI Genomics Course

    Wai K. Park, DO

    Clinical Geneticist

    City of Hope

    Wai K. Park, D.O., brings a passion for genetics research and a veteran caregiver’s empathy to her position as clinical geneticist at City of Hope.

    Dr. Park trained as a registered nurse and spent over a decade excelling in that arena, handling medical, surgical and telemetry units and also coordinating care for dialysis patients.
     
    She then pursued a science degree at California State University Los Angeles, followed by Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine training at Western University of Health Sciences Pomona, California, residency at Kaiser Permanente in Fontana, California and Clinical Genetics and Genomics Residency at University of California Irvine.
     
    Dr. Park strongly believes that genetics holds the key to preventing, detecting and treating cancer. “Understanding the underlying genetic changes that predispose someone to the development of cancer,” she says, “not only opens the door to individualized treatment options, but also may help identify other family members at risk.”
     
    The bilingual (English, Burmese) Dr. Park has firsthand experience with City of Hope: a loved one was treated here. “The compassionate care combined with leading-edge, high-quality patient care at City of Hope left a tremendous impression on me,” she said. “I consider it a privilege to join the team as a provider in the fight against cancer.”