IC 2022

 

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  • Contains 5 Component(s)

    IC 2022

    General Course Description

    City of Hope Intensive Course and Clinical Cancer Genetics Community of Practice (CCGCoP) is a multifaceted program of genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA) training and practice support. Distance delivery of a modular curriculum (Phase 1) responds to the practical time constraints of working clinicians and allows for flexible, self-directed study. Distance-learning modules are delivered over fourteen weeks, with discussion board (asynchronous) and weekly Web conference (synchronous) interactions with co-participants and course faculty to discuss evidence-based updates and address questions. Concurrent participation in Working Group Web case conferences during distance learning reinforces didactic learning and promotes GCRA skills development. Phase 2 (Track 1 only) consists of four days of interdisciplinary team-based training and program development at the City of Hope campus in Duarte, California. Upon completion of training, all participants engage in on-going self-directed professional development activities as members of the CCGCoP to support the integration of newly-acquired knowledge and skills into practice.

    This project is supported in part by funding from the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health under award numbers R25 CA112486 and R25 CA171998.

    Learning Objectives

    At the conclusion of the course, the participants should be able to:

    • Integrate cancer genetics and oncology knowledge relevant to GCRA into clinical practice
    • Apply skills commensurate with practitioner-level proficiency into GCRA practice
    • Recommend risk-appropriate options for cancer surveillance and prevention
    • Incorporate understanding of the medical, legal, and psychosocial ramifications of cancer risk counseling and testing into clinical practice and research collaboration
    • Learn about clinical research methodologies in cancer genetic epidemiology and cancer prevention trials for high-risk cohorts
    • Recognize the roles and practical issues related to Human Subjects Protection, Informed Consent, Institutional Review Board and HIPAA in clinical research
    • Provide resources and information on hereditary cancer registries, cancer epidemiology and cancer prevention studies to patients and professional colleagues
    • Utilize research training and support to participate in collaborative research activities
    • Realize greater professional self-efficacy related to cancer risk counseling and research participation skills
    • Develop a sense of connectedness and belonging to the CCGCoP learning community
    • Improve GCRA practice proficiencies through post-training engagement in the CCGCoP


    Course Requirements

    Remote learning will take place over the course of 12-weeks from November to February with a break for Thanksgiving and the Winter Holidays. Each week a different GCRA topic will be covered. Participants must complete all components of the course to receive CME certification.

    Each week, you will be expected to:

    • View the 2-4 video modules each week prior to Friday web sessions. About a total of 4 hours. You are encouraged to utilize the discussion board to post questions to faculty and peers prior to the Friday sessions.
    • Complete the weekly quiz prior to Friday web sessions. Answers will be reviewed during the Friday web session.
    • Attend required live web sessions Fridays from 8:30-10:00am PST. The faculty will review, present updates, and answer questions. Attendance is mandatory and only excused in the case of an emergency absence. Participants missing more than 1 Friday web session will not be eligible for the course certificate. If you have an emergency and cannot attend a required Friday session you must email the admin team at cgep@coh.org (only one absence is allowed).
    • Complete the weekly Distance Evaluation after the live session.
    • Complete other assignments and surveys due as noted in the course calendar


    Within the duration of the course, you will be expected to:

    • View a minimum of 5 live or recorded GCRA Case Conferences AND complete a Case Conference Feedback form for each. You have the options of these sessions listed below, please view portal calendar for up to date information and join links. Only City of Hope session recordings will be provided.
      • University of Chicago – Tuesdays, 6:30-7:30am PST
      • U.S. Oncology Network – 3rd Tuesday of the month, 10:00-11:00am PST
      • City of Hope – Wednesdays, 10:00-11:30am PST
      • NOTE: Case conference participation is an essential course requirement that helps participants develop a deeper knowledge and skills base in cancer genetics/genomics risk assessment (GCRA) through observation of and engagement in interprofessional case working applied to actual cases from GCRA cases submitted from across the U.S. and internationally.
    • View a minimum of one (live or recorded) Topics in Cancer Genetics Research Conferences (TOPICS) webinar. Live sessions are held on Fridays 11:30am -12:30pm PT. Recorded sessions are self-paced and are accessible on the course portal. https://education.ccgcop.org/webinars
    • Complete all assignments and surveys within deadlines – See course calendar in syllabus

    CME/CEU Accreditation: For information on CME/CEU accreditation, see Accreditation tab in Intensive Course Home.

  • Contains 16 Component(s)

    Electives of Intensive Course 2022

  • Contains 5 Component(s)

    Week 12 of Intensive Course

    Susan Shehayeb, MS, CGC

    Genetic Counselor

    City of Hope

    Susan Shehayeb, MS, CGC, is a licensed board-certified genetic counselor specializing in cancer genetics. She has a Master’s of Science degree in genetic counseling from University of California Irvine. Previous to completing her master’s degree, Ms. Shehayeb earned her bachelor’s degree in molecular, cell and developmental biology from University of California Los Angeles. Ms. Shehayeb joined the City of Hope Division of Clinical Cancer Genomics in 2017, having previously undergone clinical training at City of Hope. She is fluent in Arabic and is in the process of achieving fluency in Spanish. She has participated in the training of genetic counseling students from multiple programs, including assuming the role of rotation supervisor. Ms. Shehayeb's clinical role has centered on widening patient access to genetic counseling and testing throughout the City of Hope network as the lead genetic counselor for the City of Hope | South Pasadena site. Her past research investigated lifestyle choices in the context of genetic counseling and genetic testing for cancer risk. She is a member of the National Society of Genetic Counselors and the Southern California Genetic Counselors.

    Lauren Gima, MS, LCGC

    Genetic Counselor

    City of Hope

    Lauren Gima, MS, CGC is a board-certified, licensed genetic counselor at City of Hope in Duarte, CA where she specializes in clinical cancer genomics. She earned her MS degree in Genetic Counseling from Northwestern University and BS degree in Human Biology from University of California San Diego. Her primary clinical responsibilities include providing cancer genetic counseling services for City of Hope’s patient population. She is a clinical rotation supervisor for students of the Keck Graduate Institute (KGI) Genetic Counseling program, the University of California Irvine Genetic Counseling program, and the University of California Los Angeles Genetic Counseling program. She also serves as a community mentor for the KGI Genetic Counseling program, providing ongoing support and guidance for new genetic counseling students. Lauren is a member of the National Society of Genetic Counselors, the Collaborative Group of the Americas on Inherited Gastrointestinal Cancers, the Southern California Genetic Counselors, and the Minority Genetics Professionals Network.

    Rachelle Manookian, MS, CGC

    Genetic Counselor

    City of Hope

    Rachelle Manookian, M.S., C.G.C., is a board-certified genetic counselor specializing in cancer genetics. She has a special interest in prostate and genitourinary cancers. She has an M.S. in genetic counseling from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and a B.S. in biological sciences with a focus in neurobiology from University of California Irvine, as well as minors in Spanish literature and cognitive psychology. Manookian joined City of Hope’s Division of Clinical Cancer Genomics in April 2019. Prior to City of Hope, she was a general adult genetic counselor at the Greater Los Angeles VA Medical Center, where she served veterans across four VA hospitals in Southern California. Every summer, Manookian volunteers as a one-on-one counselor at Camp Sunshine during their Fanconi Anemia week. She has previous experience volunteering with victims of domestic violence, and is a California state certified domestic violence advocate. She also has special interests in education and bioethics, and her past research investigated the intersection of disability advocacy groups and prenatal genetic counseling sessions.

    Deanna Erwin, MS, CGC

    Genetic Counselor, Interim Supervisor

    Deanna Erwin MS, CGC, is a licensed, board-certified genetic counselor specializing in cancer genetics. She has a Master’s degree in Genetic Counseling from the University of Michigan and a Bachelor’s degree in Biology and Psychology from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

    Her primary clinical focus is providing risk assessment and genetic counseling services to individuals concerned about hereditary cancer risks. Ms. Erwin joined the City of Hope Division of Clinical Cancer Genomics in 2019, and previously worked as a genetic counselor at the Baylor College of Medicine Adult Genetics Clinic in Houston, TX. She is an active member of the National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) and is currently serving as Vice-Chair of the Access and Service Delivery Committee. As part of her role in NSGC, she has contributed to multiple resources designed to increase provider efficiency and access to genetic counselors.

  • Contains 4 Component(s)

    Week 11 of Intensive Course

    Ilana Solomon, ScM, MA, CGC

    Cancer Risk Counselor

    Ilana Solomon, ScM, MA, CGC is a board-certified licensed genetic counselor focusing in cancer risk assessment. She graduated from the Johns Hopkins/ National Human Genome Research Institute Genetic Counseling Training Program in January 2013. Previously trained as an anthropologist, she also holds a masters degree in physical anthropology from New York University and a bachelors degree in anthropology from Binghamton University. Ilana joined the City of Hope Division of Clinical Cancer Genomics in 2013. Her past research focuses on the psychosocial impact of receiving Variants of Unknown Significance (VUS). She currently specializes in hereditary gastrointestinal syndromes focusing on hereditary gastric cancer. Ilana also has interests in genomics education and genetic counseling research including patient-centered care, risk communication and the concept of uncertainty in healthcare. She is an active member of the National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) and is Co-Chair for the Research sub-committee of the NSGC Cancer Special Interest Group. 

    Karen Hurley, PhD

    Licensed Clinical Psychologist

    Cleveland Clinic

    Karen E. Hurley, Ph.D. is a licensed clinical psychologist at the Cleveland Clinic specializing in hereditary cancer risk and a Clinical Member of the Cancer Prevention, Control and Population Research Program at the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center. She received her A.B. in psychology from Bryn Mawr College in 1983, and her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Temple University in 1998. Before joining the Cleveland Clinic staff, she spent eight years on faculty at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center conducting NCI-funded research on patient decision-making about cancer genetic risk management and other psychosocial issues relevant to high risk patients. She has provided psychotherapy and consultation to nearly 500 individuals, families and couples with a variety of inherited cancer susceptibility syndromes, including breast/ovarian (BRCA1/2), Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), Li-Fraumeni syndrome, and diffuse gastric cancer syndrome (CDH1). Dr. Hurley has conducted numerous professional education seminars and patient workshops for organizations such as American Psycho-Oncology Society, the National Society of Genetic Counselors, and FORCE (Facing Our Risk of Cancer Empowered). She is a past or current member of several national advisory boards for high risk individuals, including FORCE, Bright Pink, Sharsheret, The Cancer Support Community’s Breast & Gastric Cancer Registries, the City of Hope National Medical Center’s Cancer Genetics Career Development Program, and the National Cancer Institute’s PDQ Cancer Genetics Editorial Advisory Board. In 2014 she received the Spirit of Empowerment-Individual Commitment award at the 8th Annual FORCE conference, in recognition of her work on behalf of the hereditary cancer community.

  • Contains 6 Component(s)

    Week 10 of Intensive Course

    Padma Rajagopal

    M.D., MPH

    Dr. Padma Sheila Rajagopal is a hematology/oncology fellow at The University of Chicago. She completed medical school at Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York, as well as an MPH in Quantitative Methods at Harvard, where her focus was on genetic epidemiology. She entered postgraduate training with residency in internal medicine at The University of Pittsburgh.

      Dr. Rajagopal is currently planning a career in academic oncology with a focus on cancer risk and hereditary syndromes as well as complex somatic genetics in patients with metastatic disease.  Some of her research interests include the interactions between germline risk and metastatic disease.>span class="normaltextrun"> She is currently working with Dr. Olufunmilayo Olopade at the University of Chicago’s Cancer Risk Clinic

    Stacy W. Gray, MD

    Associate Clinical Professor, Department of Medical Oncology

    City of Hope

    Dr. Gray received her MD from the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine. She completed her residency in Internal Medicine and her fellowship in Hematology/Oncology at The University of Chicago Hospitals. While in fellowship, Dr. Gray obtained a Masters degree in Public Policy from the University of Chicago Harris School. 
After fellowship, Dr. Gray completed a post-doctoral research fellowship in cancer communication at the University of Pennsylvania. In 2008, she joined the faculty of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, the Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School where she worked as a medical oncologist and cancer outcomes researcher in the division of Population Sciences and the Lowe Center for Thoracic Oncology. In the fall of 2016, Dr. Gray moved to The City of Hope Medical Center as an Associate Professor in the Department Medical Oncology, Population Sciences, Division of Clinical Cancer Genetics. Dr. Gray currently serves as the Deputy Director of the Center for Precision Medicine and the Division Chief for Clinical Cancer Genomics at the City of Hope.

    Dr. Gray’s research focuses on understanding the medical and psychosocial outcomes related to the use of genomic technologies in cancer care.  One of Dr. Gray’s goals is to understand the relationships between information dissemination, on an individual and population level, and the adoption of personalized cancer technologies. Dr. Gray also studies the clinical implementation of cancer whole-exome sequencing (WES), the "actionability" of sequence data in different populations, the integration of genomic data into the electronic health record and the social and behavioral science methods that can be used to answer emerging questions in cancer dissemination and implementation research. Dr. Gray’s overall goal is to gain a better understanding of how a variety of factors may be working to drive the use of new genomic technologies and design targeted interventions to improve the delivery of personalized cancer care. 

    Jeffrey Weitzel, MD

    Professor of Oncology and Population Sciences

    Jeffrey N. Weitzel, MD, is board Certified in Medical Oncology and Clinical Genetics, and founded the Clinical Cancer Genomics Community Research Network. He co-founded the Clinical Cancer Genomics Community of Practice with Dr. Blazer. A Breast Cancer Research Foundation Scholar and an honorary Professor of Oncology for the Latin American School of Oncology, he is also the ASCO Conquer Cancer Research Professor in Breast Cancer Disparities. At the vanguard of precision prevention, Dr. Weitzel’s multidisciplinary clinical, research, and training experience emphasize translational research in cancer disparities, genomic cancer risk assessment, chemoprevention, targeted therapy, clinical and psychosocial outcomes, genetic epidemiology and health services research, with a focus on underserved populations. Dr. Weitzel received the American Society of Human Genetics Arno Motulsky-Barton Childs Award for Excellence in Human Genetics Education.

    Bita Nehoray, MS, CGC

    Senior Genetic Counselor

    City of Hope

    Bita Nehoray, MS, CGC, is a licensed board-certified genetic counselor specializing in cancer genetics. She received her Master’s degree in Human Genetics and Genetic Counseling from Stanford University. Ms. Nehoray joined the City of Hope Division of Clinical Cancer Genomics in 2012, where she provides cancer genetics services for patients and families suspected to have a hereditary predisposition to cancer, with a focus in Li-Fraumeni syndrome. She is fluent in Spanish and Farsi and is committed to advancing the provision of cancer genetics services to medically underserved and culturally diverse populations. Other clinical responsibilities include providing pro-bono cancer genetic counseling services to underserved Latino families through an outreach program established by the Division of Clinical Cancer Genomics and supported through government and foundations grants and compassionate funding. Current research projects include understanding cancer risk, penetrance, prevalence, and clinical outcomes for individuals with TP53 mutations as part of the LiFT Up study, evaluating the spectrum of germline variants in Israeli breast cancer patients, and assessing Community-based provider experiences with polygenic risk scores in genetic cancer risk assessment. She serves on the Genetic Counseling Advisory Committee for the Li-Fraumeni Syndrome Association. She is an active member of the National Society of Genetic Counselors, Southern California Genetic Counselors, and the American Society of Human Genetics.

  • Contains 7 Component(s)

    Week 9 of Intensive Course

    Tobias Else, MD

    Section Head, Neuro-Oncology, Physician, Division of Medical Oncology & Therapeutics Research

    University of Michigan

    Dr. Else’s primary appointment is with the Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology and Diabetes. He received his MD degree from the University of Hamburg, Germany. He pursued his clinical training at the University of Hamburg (Residency: Internal Medicine) and the University of Michigan (Residency: Internal Medicine, Fellowship: Endocrinology). His main research interests are the genetics of endocrine tumors. Dr. Else’s clinical practice focuses on the care for patients with benign and malignant endocrine tumors, particularly pheochromocytoma, adrenocortical tumors and neuroendocrine tumors as well as accompanying hormone excess syndromes (e.g Cushing syndrome, primary aldosteronism). Dr. Else has a particular interest in taking care of patients with hereditary syndromes that predispose to the development of endocrine tumors (e.g. Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia (MEN) type 1, MEN2A & MEN2B, Hereditary Paraganglioma Syndrome). He attends the Multidisciplinary Endocrine Oncology Clinic, where patients with tumors receive diagnostic procedures and treatment. In addition he is part of the Cancer Genetics Clinic, which evaluates patients for hereditary syndromes and also facilitates regular exams and surveillance for patients at risk for endocrine tumors. Dr. Else serves on the Clinical Guidelines Subcommittee and the Guidelines Task Force of the Endocrine Society and is the Program Director of the Endocrine Fellowship at the University of Michigan.

    Brian Shuch, MD

    Director of the Kidney Cancer Program and the Alvin & Carrie Meinhardt Endowed Chair in Kidney Cancer Research

    University of California, Los Angeles

    Dr. Brian M. Shuch’s decision to study urologic oncology was a personal one: he wanted to help others defeat cancer after watching a member of his own family succumb to the disease. “I wanted to be a surgeon in a field where patients have excellent outcomes with surgery,” he explains. “I also wanted to be involved with systemic therapy and cutting-edge research.” At Yale, Dr. Shuch runs the urologic oncology cancer research bank, where all tissue, urine, and blood is stored for future research within the Yale Cancer Center.

    Dr. Shuch completed his urology residency and surgery internship at the University of California, Los Angeles and played a key role in its Kidney Cancer Program. After his residency, he completed a three-year urologic oncology fellowship at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), focusing on clinical trials, drug development, and the comprehensive management of patients with kidney cancer. He holds a joint appointment from the Yale School of Medicine in the Urology and Diagnostic Radiology departments.

    In addition to his clinical interests, which include open and robotic surgery, systemic therapy, percutaneous kidney tumor biopsies and cryoablation—the use of extreme cold to kill cancer cells—Dr. Shuch is committed to limiting over-treatment of non-aggressive urologic cancers. When appropriate, he prefers a strategy of active surveillance and the integration of genetic testing in cancer care.

    Dr. Shuch is a member of two oncology clinical trial groups, the Society of Urologic Oncology and SWOG, formerly the Southwest Oncology Group, which receives support from the National Cancer Institute (NCI). He helps run the multidisciplinary Yale Kidney Cancer Tumor Board and is part of the kidney cancer clinical trial team. These trials involve treatment of the disease at all stages, from small localized tumors to advanced metastatic disease. “Our improved understanding of the genetics of kidney cancer will allow the integration of molecular markers into treatment algorithms,” he explains. Studies show that molecular markers can be useful in many ways, including measuring the progress of disease and evaluating the most effective therapy for a particular cancer type.

    Veda Giri, MD

    Associate Professor in Medical Oncology and Cancer Biology at Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center

    Thomas Jefferson University

    Veda N. Giri, MD is an Associate Professor in Medical Oncology and Cancer Biology at Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center at Thomas Jefferson University. She is a medical oncologist with a clinical and research interest in inherited cancer risk assessment. Dr. Giri has recently assumed the position of Director of Cancer Risk Assessment and Clinical Cancer Genetics at Thomas Jefferson University, where her role will be to lead an integrated and comprehensive effort in inherited cancer risk assessment and conduct studies focused on genetic evaluation of cancer risk. Her clinical efforts will be focused on genetic evaluation of inherited risk for GU cancers, specifically prostate, kidney, and upper tract urothelial cancers. Research studies will encompass genetic characterization of cancer risk using sequencing technologies, molecular signatures, and novel biomarkers to ultimately reduce cancer-related morbidity and mortality. Her research also has a strong focus in cancer disparities.

    Dr. Giri received her medical degree from Jefferson Medical College, and proceeded to complete her residency in Internal Medicine and fellowship in Hematology-Oncology at the University of Michigan. She then completed advanced training in molecular cancer genetics at Fox Chase Cancer Center (FCCC). From 2006-2014, she directed prostate cancer risk assessment at FCCC, developing studies focused on evaluating the role of genetic markers in prostate cancer risk assessment. Dr. Giri has served on national committees including the National Comprehensive Cancer Network Prostate Cancer Early Detection Panel and NIH PDQ® Cancer Genetics Editorial Board, contributing expertise in cancer risk assessment and prostate cancer genetics.

    Rachelle Manookian, MS, CGC

    Genetic Counselor

    City of Hope

    Rachelle Manookian, M.S., C.G.C., is a board-certified genetic counselor specializing in cancer genetics. She has a special interest in prostate and genitourinary cancers. She has an M.S. in genetic counseling from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and a B.S. in biological sciences with a focus in neurobiology from University of California Irvine, as well as minors in Spanish literature and cognitive psychology. Manookian joined City of Hope’s Division of Clinical Cancer Genomics in April 2019. Prior to City of Hope, she was a general adult genetic counselor at the Greater Los Angeles VA Medical Center, where she served veterans across four VA hospitals in Southern California. Every summer, Manookian volunteers as a one-on-one counselor at Camp Sunshine during their Fanconi Anemia week. She has previous experience volunteering with victims of domestic violence, and is a California state certified domestic violence advocate. She also has special interests in education and bioethics, and her past research investigated the intersection of disability advocacy groups and prenatal genetic counseling sessions.

  • Contains 7 Component(s)

    Week 8 of Intensive Course

    Sandra Dreike, MS, CGC

    Genetic Counselor

    City of Hope

    Sandra Dreike, MS, CGC is a licensed board-certified genetic counselor who specializes in cancer genetics. She received her Master of Science degree is Genetic Counseling from University of California, Irvine and her bachelor’s degree in Biology from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo. Sandra joined the City of Hope Division of Clinical Cancer Genomics in 2019. She previously practiced as a genetic counselor in Honolulu, HI where she specialized in cancer genetics and general pediatric and adult genetics. Sandra provides genetic counseling and cancer genetic risk assessments at City of Hope. In addition to patient care she assists with the Intensive Course and is involved in research. Sandra is a member of the National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) and Southern California Genetic Counselors (SCGC).

    Jane Churpek, MD

    Assistant Professor, Section of Hematology/Oncology and Center for Clinical Cancer Genetics

    University of Chicago

    Dr. Jane Churpek is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Hematology, Oncology, and Palliative Care at The University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Hematology, and Oncology. In her clinical practice, she cares for adults with low blood counts due to acquired and inherited causes, including clonal hematopoiesis and inherited bone marrow failure syndromes, and performs diagnosis and management of diverse hereditary cancer predisposition syndromes such as familial leukemia, Li Fraumeni syndrome, BAP1 syndrome, etc. She runs a translational research program aimed at defining the inherited basis of cancer and bone marrow disorders, especially among understudied tumors and blood disorders. Her goal is to improve diagnosis, early detection, treatment and, ultimately, prevention of morbidity and mortality for patients with these disorders. Dr. Churpek has contributed to the understanding of several novel hereditary blood cancer predisposition syndromes and the role of inherited predisposition in exposure associated cancers such as therapy-related leukemia and mesothelioma.

    Wai K. Park, DO

    Clinical Geneticist

    City of Hope

    Wai K. Park, D.O., brings a passion for genetics research and a veteran caregiver’s empathy to her position as clinical geneticist at City of Hope.

    Dr. Park trained as a registered nurse and spent over a decade excelling in that arena, handling medical, surgical and telemetry units and also coordinating care for dialysis patients.
     
    She then pursued a science degree at California State University Los Angeles, followed by Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine training at Western University of Health Sciences Pomona, California, residency at Kaiser Permanente in Fontana, California and Clinical Genetics and Genomics Residency at University of California Irvine.
     
    Dr. Park strongly believes that genetics holds the key to preventing, detecting and treating cancer. “Understanding the underlying genetic changes that predispose someone to the development of cancer,” she says, “not only opens the door to individualized treatment options, but also may help identify other family members at risk.”
     
    The bilingual (English, Burmese) Dr. Park has firsthand experience with City of Hope: a loved one was treated here. “The compassionate care combined with leading-edge, high-quality patient care at City of Hope left a tremendous impression on me,” she said. “I consider it a privilege to join the team as a provider in the fight against cancer.”

  • Contains 7 Component(s)

    Week 7 of Intensive Course

    Heather Hampel, MS, CGC

    Associate Director, Division of Clinical Cancer Genomics

    City of Hope

    Heather Hampel completed her Bachelor of Science degree in Molecular Genetics at the Ohio State University in 1993.  She attained her Master’s degree in Human Genetics from Sarah Lawrence College in 1995.  She received certification from the American Board of Genetic Counseling in 1996.  She worked as a cancer genetic counselor at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center from 1995-1997 and at The Ohio State University from 1997-2021. She is now at City of Hope National Medical Center where she is a Professor in the Department of Medical Oncology & Therapeutics Research and Associate Director of the Division of Clinical Cancer Genomics.  Her research areas of interest include Lynch syndrome and universal screening for Lynch syndrome.  She has over 90 publications; including first author publications in the New England Journal of Medicine, Cancer Research, and the Journal of Clinical Oncology.  Heather is a former member of the Board of Directors of the National Society of Genetic Counselors (Region IV Representative in 2003-4) and of the American Board of Genetic Counseling  (2007-2011) where she served as President in 2009 and 2010.  She received the Region IV Leadership Award from NSGC in 2006. She was on the Steering Committee of the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable from 2016-2020. She was on the Council for the Collaborative Group of the Americas on Inherited Gastrointestinal Cancers from 2015-2018 and served as president from 2017-2018. She was Secretary/Treasurer Elect of NSGC in 2021 and will be Secretary/Treasurer in 2022.

    Patrick Lynch, MD

    Professor, Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, & Nutrition

    The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

    Dr. Patrick Lynch is a gastroenterologist and scientist with specific expertise in cancer risk for mismatch repair gene mutation carriers. He is a Professor of Medicine in the Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition at UT-MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas. Dr. Lynch received his Law degree and degree in Medicine from Creighton University. His internship and residency were at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. He completed his Fellowship in Gastroenterology at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. Dr. Lynch provides surveillance for patients and families with hereditary colorectal cancers, and is actively involved in the counseling and management of these patients and families. He has led or collaborated on multiple NIH- and industry-funded studies in hereditary colorectal cancers, including basic science, clinical, chemoprevention and behavioral studies. He is a member of Council for and past President of the International Society for Gastrointestinal Hereditary Tumors (INSIGHT) and is past President of the Collaborative Group of the Americas on Inherited Colorectal Cancer. He was recently awarded a grant under the UTMDACC “Moonshot” program for further development of a web-based registry for familial cancer families.

    Lauren Gima, MS, CGC

    Genetic Counselor

    City of Hope

    Lauren Gima, MS, CGC is a board-certified, licensed genetic counselor at City of Hope in Duarte, CA where she specializes in clinical cancer genomics. She earned her MS degree in Genetic Counseling from Northwestern University and BS degree in Human Biology from University of California San Diego. Her primary clinical responsibilities include providing cancer genetic counseling services for City of Hope’s patient population. She is a clinical rotation supervisor for students of the Keck Graduate Institute (KGI) Genetic Counseling program, the University of California Irvine Genetic Counseling program, and the University of California Los Angeles Genetic Counseling program. She also serves as a community mentor for the KGI Genetic Counseling program, providing ongoing support and guidance for new genetic counseling students. Lauren is a member of the National Society of Genetic Counselors, the Collaborative Group of the Americas on Inherited Gastrointestinal Cancers, the Southern California Genetic Counselors, and the Minority Genetics Professionals Network.

    Deanna Erwin, MS, CGC

    Genetic Counselor, Interim Supervisor

    Deanna Erwin MS, CGC, is a licensed, board-certified genetic counselor specializing in cancer genetics. She has a Master’s degree in Genetic Counseling from the University of Michigan and a Bachelor’s degree in Biology and Psychology from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

    Her primary clinical focus is providing risk assessment and genetic counseling services to individuals concerned about hereditary cancer risks. Ms. Erwin joined the City of Hope Division of Clinical Cancer Genomics in 2019, and previously worked as a genetic counselor at the Baylor College of Medicine Adult Genetics Clinic in Houston, TX. She is an active member of the National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) and is currently serving as Vice-Chair of the Access and Service Delivery Committee. As part of her role in NSGC, she has contributed to multiple resources designed to increase provider efficiency and access to genetic counselors.

  • Contains 7 Component(s)

    Week 6 of Intensive Course

    Sonia S. Kupfer, MD

    Assistant Professor of Medicine

    University of Chicago Medical Center

    Sonia S. Kupfer is an Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Section of Gastroenterology at the University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL. She is the Director of the Gastrointestinal Cancer Risk and Prevention Clinic and co-Director of the Comprehensive Cancer Risk and Prevention clinic at the University of Chicago. She is funded by a K08 career development award from the NIH/NCI to study colorectal cancer genetic susceptibility variants in African Americans. Dr. Kupfer is also currently investigating genetics related to chemopreventive agents for colorectal cancer, notably vitamin D. In addition to her translational research, Dr. Kupfer is actively engaged in clinical studies in high-risk colorectal cancer primarily Lynch syndrome. Her clinical work focuses on hereditary GI cancer evaluation, testing and management. She also has served as co-Director of two CME conferences on genomics. Dr. Kupfer received her undergraduate degree from Yale University and then completed medical school, residency, chief residency and gastroenterology fellowship training at the University of Chicago. She is originally from a northern suburb of Chicago and currently resides in the Hyde Park area with her husband, an art dealer, and her two children.

    Gregory Idos MD, MS

    Associate Clinical Professor, Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology

    City of Hope

    Dr. Idos is a board-certified gastroenterologist and trained cancer geneticist, who specializes in the care of patients with Lynch syndrome, FAP (familial adenomatous polyposis) and other inherited syndromes. The goal of his research is to find new ways to prevent cancer and to improve treatment and care for cancer patients.

    A UCLA graduate, Dr. Idos has a master’s degree from Keck School of Medicine of USC. He received his medical degree at University of Vermont, continued his residency training at USC and completed his gastroenterology fellowship at Brigham and Women’s Hospital at Harvard. Dr. Idos is an associate clinical professor in Division of Gastroenterology and leads one of the largest multicenter studies examining the benefits and harms of “multiplex” gene panel testing. His research also focuses on the evaluation of novel technologies with the goal of providing new tools for hereditary cancer risk assessment and the development of novel cellular models to elucidate the fundamental mechanisms of microsatellite instability and Lynch syndrome.

    Rachelle Manookian, MS, CGC

    Genetic Counselor

    City of Hope

    Rachelle Manookian, M.S., C.G.C., is a board-certified genetic counselor specializing in cancer genetics. She has a special interest in prostate and genitourinary cancers. She has an M.S. in genetic counseling from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and a B.S. in biological sciences with a focus in neurobiology from University of California Irvine, as well as minors in Spanish literature and cognitive psychology. Manookian joined City of Hope’s Division of Clinical Cancer Genomics in April 2019. Prior to City of Hope, she was a general adult genetic counselor at the Greater Los Angeles VA Medical Center, where she served veterans across four VA hospitals in Southern California. Every summer, Manookian volunteers as a one-on-one counselor at Camp Sunshine during their Fanconi Anemia week. She has previous experience volunteering with victims of domestic violence, and is a California state certified domestic violence advocate. She also has special interests in education and bioethics, and her past research investigated the intersection of disability advocacy groups and prenatal genetic counseling sessions.

  • Contains 5 Component(s)

    Week 5 of Intensive Course

    Judy Garber, MD, MPH

    Director, Center for Cancer Genetics and Prevention

    Dana Farber Cancer Institute

    Dr. Garber is the Director of the Cancer Genetics and Prevention Disease Center at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and a Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Garber conducts research in clinical cancer genetics, with a special focus in the genetics of breast cancer. She has played a major role in the development of national guidelines in cancer genetics. She is also a leader in research into the characteristics and treatment of triple negative or basal-like breast cancer, the most common form in women with BRCA1 mutations. Her translational research focuses on the evaluation of novel agents targeting DNA repair defects in breast cancer, including PARP inhibitors for treatment and prevention of breast cancer and other BRCA-associated cancers.

     In 2011-2012, Dr. Garber was the President of American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), the largest organization of cancer researchers in the world. She is a member of the National Cancer Advisory Board and was recently elected to the Institute of Medicine.

    Carol Fabian, MD

    Director, Breast Cancer Prevention & Survivorship Centers

    KU Breast Cancer Prevention Center

    Dr. Carol Fabian is a breast medical oncologist, University Distinguished Professor, and holds the Morris Endowed Chair in Cancer Prevention at the University of Kansas Medical Center.  She received her medical degree from the University of Kansas in 1972, and fellowship in Medical Oncology at the University of Kansas in 1977.  She is board certified in both Internal Medicine and Medical Oncology.  She  has been on the faculty in the Division of Medical Oncology since 1977 and has served in multiple capacities including Medical Director of the Cancer Center, Founder and Director of the Breast Cancer Prevention and Survivorship Research Center, Leader or co-Leader of the Cancer Prevention Program, and Associate Director of Clinical Research in the NCI Designated Cancer Center.